In memory of Dylan Thomas

Welsh poet and writer Dylan Thomas was born one hundred years ago today, but I wonder have my children even heard of him.  I'm not actually a big reader of poetry, but Dylan was different.  His words really got under my skin, and scratched those raw places in my psyche like nothing else could.

It was a family thing too: my third name was given in memory of his wife, and I have inherited a well-thumbed copy of Under Milk Wood that I always read aloud in a really bad Welsh accent.

Then I lost my Dad in November 2011, and that sent me hurtling straight back into Dylan's embrace once again.  No-one for me has ever captured so well those overwhelming feelings of anger and grief at the loss of a loved one.  Surely there cannot be anyone who has not read this, but just in case, here it is...

Do not go gentle into that good night, 
Old age should burn and rave at close of day; 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light. 

Though wise men at their end know dark is right, 
Because their words had forked no lightning they 
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright 
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, 
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, 
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight 
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height, 
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray. 
Do not go gentle into that good night. 
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

This week also marks the seventh anniversary of the passing of my lovely mum. Impossible to believe that it has been so long xx



12 comments:

  1. Under Milk Wood always reminds me of my parents too. Mum had a cassette tape of Richard Burton reading it and used to play it in the car to all of us. Always loved it even when I had no clue what it was all about. Sending hugs to you x

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    1. Aww Kate, I remember the Richard Burton recording now, loved that so much x

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  2. Powerful poem and I get what it means to you. Thinking of you ..... ((xx))

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  3. One of my favorite old stomping grounds when I lived in N.Y.C. was "The White Horse Tavern",,a place he frequented..I have often had people remark that the death of a loved one gets easier over time..I don't believe that..I think that we just become more accustomed to it-but the scar is still there-and every now and then-the pain is equal if not more..I'm sorry if you are feeling low..((())).

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    1. As you say, you just learn to live with the death of a loved one. The grief never really goes away x

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  4. Such powerful words from an amazing poet. Thinking of you as you remember your Mum and also your Dad. xx

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  5. So sorry to know you are remembering both your parents this month. There is nothing like poetry to give words to our feelings. My favourite poems on grief are Remember http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/174266 and when I am really deeply feeling my grief and hurting as only grief can make you hurt, I love the poem 'you all have lied'.http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/175761 Thinking of you.

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    1. Thanks so much for sharing those links, I will keep them for whenever I need them xx

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