Reasons to be cheerful despite School Refusal

So the return to school did not go quite as planned, and I won't tell you about my feelings as they are not pretty.  I've taken to posting Facebook updates that only I can see.  But, as per my resolutions, I am still maintaining a calm facade.  Ditto the school, as I have been unable to make contact, and no-one appears to have rung me either.  I've promised not to write about him on here, so I can't ask you to help me, and I'm sure that my Facebook friends are sick of this problem too, so I'll probably just grit and grind my teeth and try to focus on my reasons to be cheerful instead:

The Hobbit


I got to see this film again with a twitter pal and it was SO much better the second time around, perhaps because I did not have the same (unrealistic?) expectations.  I ought to update my review, but in the meantime you could try this one instead.

More Help


The health services always get a good bashing and sometimes from me, but it was a concerned District Nurse that suggested and organised a home help for me in the mornings.  I would struggle without this service now.  More help has been offered, but I was concerned that I would have to stay at home to avail of it and when the kids were younger, I took them to activities most days, and there were regular trips away too.  But that does not happen now, so I have applied - and been approved - for an hour of home help in the evenings.  It will start as soon as funding becomes available: and that's another story of course.

Decluttering


This has become one of my favourite activities.  It's not always easy: I hate waste, so I hate throwing things away too.  But I read recently about a rule of thumb that says that 90% of your stuff can be replaced for less than €20, so if you do throw something away and need it later, it's not likely to cause a financial crisis.  That has really encouraged me.  Earlier this week I got rid of most of my jewellery, and the enormous box that housed it (which I never liked).  It was all cheap stuff and it killed me to throw it out, but I rarely wear jewellery these days, and I won't have to feel guilty about that now.  So it's all good.

Learning About Autism


I confess to feeling a tad jealous at times of those friends of mine who regularly attend training courses, workshops and conferences, even when they're about special needs.  It's a break, and the learning will hopefully help your child too.  Then I read that some last minute tickets had become available for a major autism conference.  It's on a school day, it's about education, and it looks as though I may be one of the lucky people who is going to get a place.  It could be just what I need.  Perhaps there I will find some answers to the school refusal problem.


Reasons to be Cheerful



13 comments:

  1. ugh, school refusal is bloody hard! If you ever need to rant to a private ear, you can have my email. I will always give you my ear xxx
    (otherwise, great reasons!! love a good declutter) x

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  2. This friend is not sick of hearing about the school issues. I really feel for you both.... and am only too happy to be a listening ear. As for decluttering, you would have a heart attack if you saw the amount of crap I have in my house!! Thinking of you. xx

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  3. ooh good luck with the conference. Hope the school issue is resolved soon. Good news on the home help front. I so need to declutter

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  4. I should say that I did hear from the school after I wrote this!

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  5. Goods and bads. Hope the school thing and the home help all get resolved soonest. xxx

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  6. I like your view about decluttering...Should follow that myself ;-) I would love to attend some conference or workshop about autism as well but it's always on week days, or I miss the date etc, I hope you learn a lot. I also hope the school situation will get sorted :-)

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    1. This conference was partly on the weekend, and you wouldn't loved it :-)

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  7. School refusal is so hard. As you know secondary school was hell for my son but now that he is in college and focusing on his area of interest (IT) it is easier getting him in. As for my daughter, I have found that teaching my daughter formally (as they do in school) is not working very well. I suppose some may say that this failure is down to my teaching but with 8 years in community education I think I have some ability to teach. What I think is that our education system is very much set up on a curriculum politically agreed upon and imposed on us and our children. Whilst this may work for younger children, it is much harder to teach the teenager with aspergers who doesn't like been told what to learn, particularly when its a subject they're not interested in. Now my emphasis is on teaching her without her noticing; ie working with her natural curiosity and doing plenty of practical and visual stuff on things that interest her. Its quite interesting to see how much more engaged she is and how much knowledge she is acquiring this way. I just wish our education system (in general) could do a better job of teaching our autistic students because from what I see, they're failing. Hope you resolve the school refusal situation very soon. Deb x.

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    1. I'm absolutely sure that you have buckets of talent as a teacher, but I think there's a difference dynamic when you are teaching your own child on a one-to-one, and I don't think it can work in every family. And yes, if my son's education could only focus around his interests (which he is losing due to anxiety I think) I believe that school would work so much better for him. x

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