Journey to the bottom of my garden

My garden is a mysterious place, rarely visited, except to hang out washing and water pots. My habitat these days is the kitchen, where I look out at the bins and ivy covered walks, where nothing else agrees to grow, and that little patch of sky above the next door chimney pots. There's a hundred years of history in the garden, china fragments rise to the surface, plants unplanted appear and flourish. In fact they flourish too well. The bottom of the garden used to look like this, with wild flowers enjoying the dappled sunshine and shade provided by a beautiful yellow-blossomed laburnum tree. But sadly it never recovered from the snows of 2010 and 2011, it just limped on like a raggedy old scarecrow.


In between times, I always prioritised the front garden, though you might not know it when you see the care and attention lavished by other home owners nearby. I would do a bit out the back, I would get so far down and then I would be called in. One child would need something, and then there would be a meal to make, bedtime to organise and the chance to finish tidying the garden would be gone.

So the wilderness took over. It's amazing how fast nettles and buddleia can grow unchecked. Not to mention the shrubs that reached for the sky with ever increasing confidence, while the bindweed curled its deadly vines around everything in sight and its white trumpets softened the edges of the neglected trampoline.

Something had to be done, and I knew that I didn't have the time to do it. Or expertise. Can you imagine me with a chainsaw? I try to tackle most things, but that was a step too far...

For once no-one could help, no-one had any recommendations. So finally I took a chance on an on-line site. I tried not to think about all the possible things that could go wrong, hired someone, and kept every finger crossed when he arrived with all the kit at 9.15 am yesterday.

This is what he was faced with.


Going...


Gone.


So now I can reach the bottom of my garden, but what do I do with it? Any ideas welcome.

7 comments:

  1. Wow what a transformation. I can't wait to see what you do with it. Maybe use reclaimed bricks or rocks to outline flowerbeds and fill them with soil so you can begin planting some colourful flowers? And you must have a tree - something small that won't grow roots that interfere with building foundations. Good luck.

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    1. I hadn't realised how much space was there! Not sure about flower beds (too much work), but definitely at least one tree :)

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  2. Oh, the possibilities, what a lovely space and I think you struck lucky with the person you hired, he did a really good job. I'd stain that bench from the middle photo and put it back in there and sit on it and just love that space. I'd definitely lay gravel (I'm not sure if that's that easy, you might need to dig it all out first....isn't easy for me to say I'd do it when I haven't a clue) and paint/whitewash the walls. But really I don't know, there's so much you could do.

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    1. Others have said similar about the seat, and I must do that alright! I'm thinking creeper rather than paint, but then there's that square of wall that has already been painted...

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  3. Wow, great clear-out! (Loved your preceding descriptions) Definitely keep the bench. I'm always conscious of laying pebbles, or more particularly paving gardens. My advice would be to be careful. Drainage is important and too many paved gardens causes flooding somewhere for someone ;)
    Some pretty, low maintenance, flowers that re-flower each year would be nice? A tree I'd love in my garden would be a miniature Weeping Willow. Again be careful as big trees in small gardens have widely spreading roots. That travel to other gardens and in time can shift walls!!

    xx from your very non-green fingered friend!!

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    1. I'm not certian but I think weeping willows are notorious fro having problematic roots that interefere with building foundations.

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  4. Oh wow, what a difference. I am not a gardner so would suggest some huge pots that you can fill with overflowing flowers. How about a little wrought iron table and a couple of chairs? Can't wait to see what you do. xx

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